My Village, My Lobster

Directed by Josh Wolff
Visit on Facebook .
My Village, My Lobsteis the powerful, harrowing and shocking story of the indigenous Miskito lobster divers along Nicaragua’s Miskito Coast who risk their lives diving for the region’s most lucrative resource – the Caribbean spiny lobster, the vast majority of which ends up in the United States.

.
..
Contribute to This Film

 

.

.

Commercial lobster diving is the Coast’s largest industry, accounting for over $40 million annually and employing more than 5,000 Nicaraguans, most of whom are indigenous Miskito Indians. Over the past 30 years, thousands of Miskito divers have become paralyzed and hundreds more have died due to decompression sickness, a diving-related condition commonly known as the bends.
.

Through the voices of Miskito lobster divers and their families, as well as boat owners, captains, and doctors, My Village, My Lobster tells the story of an industry and a community in crisis.

.
Josh Wolff helped produce the first Discovery Educator Abroad media program around the Pacific Rim for Discovery Education while traveling with the cast and crew of the Travel Channel’s “5 Takes”. He has since collaborated on a variety of non-fiction media projects including the forthcoming documentary Voices of Uganda, a film about a unique theatre program and ex-child soldiers in northern Uganda. He also co-founded MyDigiStory.org, an international organization bridging literacy and filmmaking with a focus on digital storytelling with the worlds most at-risk and underrepresented youth. He currently works as an Instructional Technology Specialist in Manhattan teaching educators how to integrate digtial tools from the classroom.

Brad Allgood works as a producer, cinematographer and editor for film and television in Washington, DC. He has a diverse background in the biological and physical sciences as well as international development, Latin American affairs and public health. He served for 3 ½ years in the Peace Corps in Nicaragua during which he discovered his passion for film and television through his work on a youth HIV/AIDS national broadcast television project. He has produced and filmed several award-winning films including EcoViews: Three Stories from the Chesapeake Bay, which was a 2010 Student Academy Award National Finalist and CINE Silver winner; the feature-length documentary The Road We Know in Botswana; and Waiting for Oil, a 30-minute documentary about the Deepwater Horizon oil disaster. Brad holds a M.A. in Film and Video Production from American University in Washington, D.C.

Christopher Vitale has worked on the following films in various capacities: Being John Malkovich, Nurse Betty, O Brother, Where Art Thou?, and Delivering Milo and also worked in production sound mixing on features through his work at Lentini Communications.
.
Nomading Films Founded by Josh Wolff, Nomading Films produces non-fiction media out of New York as well as co-founding the Brooklyn-based Nomading Film Festival.

.

.

Share