Peacemaking Circle

Directed by Julie Mallozzi
Visit Film Site: juliemallozzi.com
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peacemaking-circle_still_01Peacemaking Circle is a multimedia project that will consist of a five-channel video installation, a website, and a DVD. It explores dynamic applications of a Native American tradition in which community members resolve conflict by convening a special ritual circle. Peacemaking circles place participants on an equal footing, and use a “talking piece” to focus on storytelling, empathetic listening, and shared values.

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The video installation can be mounted in museums, schools, conferences, community centers, religious institutions, or even courthouses. The installation will be tailored to each location, and ideally will project the five videos in five different rooms. Each video will feature a peacemaking circle from a different community, unfolding in real time – a single, continuous take with no edits. Viewers will wander in and out of the rooms, immersing themselves in the resolution of diverse conflicts through the same process. The installation invites community members to reflect on their own powers to bring restorative justice without relying solely on the law and the criminal justice system.

The website will create a virtual community in which organizations can both develop peacemaking circle practices and advocate for systemic incorporation of restorative justice approaches. The site will include teaching tools and real-life examples of peacemaking circles in schools, child welfare agencies, public planning processes, and justice system settings. Consistent with the grassroots nature of the restorative justice movement, the website will help local organizations convince communities and administrative leaders to engage in circle processes. The DVD will present materials from the website for organizations to use at meetings, conference, and trainings without access to the Internet.

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Julie Mallozzi is an independent documentary filmmaker whose work explores the fluidity of cultural identity and historical memory. Her films have won awards at festivals around the world and have screened in museums, universities, and on public television. Julie’s debut film Once Removed tells the story of meeting her mother’s family in China and learning about their involvement in China’s complicated political history. Her recent film Monkey Dance reveals how traditional Cambodian dance helped three Cambodian-American teens navigate the minefields of urban adolescence. She is now completing Indelible Lalita, the story of a resilient woman whose body has been remarkably transformed through loss of skin pigment, cancer, and other conditions.

Julie received her BA from Harvard University and her MFA from San Francisco Art Institute. She has taught at Harvard University, Massachusetts College of Art and Design, and Boston University.

Support for Peacemaking Circle has been generously provided by Mass Humanities, LEF Foundation, and Private Donors.
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