Kopkind Retreat 2011 Filmmakers Announced

We are delighted to announce the filmmakers attending this year’s CID / Kopkind Filmmakers Retreat & Seminars in Guilford, VT.
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2011 brings us a wonderful group of filmmakers with a diverse range of documentary film works and backgrounds.
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Mark your calendars for the Kopkind Grassroots Film Festival, which takes place during the retreat- Friday and Saturday, August 5th & 6th. The screenings are open to the public with the filmmakers in attendance. This year the festival presents Coexist, by director Adam Mazo- and Left On Pearl, by Susan Rivo.

More information on the screenings: 2011 Grasroots Film Festival Schedule

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Meet the Filmmakers:

Jesse Freeston is an independent video-journalist. He is a frequent contributor of mini-documentary style news reports to The Real News Network, an independent daily video news service based out of D.C. and Toronto. His reports have largely focused on amplifying the voice of social movements in North and Central America. Some of the highlights of his work have been coverage of the year-long miner strike at the world’s largest nickel mine in Sudbury, Ontario, the campaign to cut Medicare and Social Security in Washington, DC, the Salvadoran anti-gold mining movement, and the Honduran campesino land occupation movement, also the topic of his first feature-length documentary project. He is perhaps most known for his exposure of electoral fraud during the post-military coup elections in Honduras in November, 2009. He is born in North Bay, Ontario, raised in Ottawa, and currently without fixed address.

Learn more about his work from The Real News Network:
http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&Itemid=74&jumival=4259
http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&Itemid=74&jumival=6513

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David A. Goldenberg was raised in Europe and spent much of his twenties in East Africa. In the 1970s, while completing a PhD in anthropology, he coordinated a university degree program for older students. Then, over three decades, used his skills as an applied anthropologist to plan, support, and evaluate international development projects in thirty-five countries for such NGOs as CARE, Save the Children, and Plan International. In the late 1960s, as a semi-professional photographer and Peace Corps volunteer, he had the opportunity to run the Visual Aids Unit of a Kenya Government Ministry. David’s dream when entering Brown’s anthropology doctoral program was to make ethnographic films. That dream was not realized until ten years ago. Since then he has made documentary films concerned with international development, U.S. community organizations, personal biography, and the arts. These have included several short films about politically significant Israeli plays.

Learn more about his current film in progress, Return to Haifa: http://documentaries.org/cid-films/return-to-haifa

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Jonathan Goldman
is an independent filmmaker who studied Fine Art, Theatre, Music, and Philosophy at the University Of Massachusetts, Amherst, graduating in 1992. A lifelong poet and musician, Goldman attended Boston University’s Center for Digital Imaging Arts from 2006 to 2008 earning a Certificate in Digital Filmmaking and the unique Area 51 Award. Goldman was a standout and a quadruple threat as he wrote, produced, directed, and edited. Since attending BU, he has been immersed in the freelance world of filmmaking active in all phases of production. His commercial and industrial film credits include work for Bank of America, Honeywell, and the Connecticut Science Center. Currently a resident of New York City, his other credits include work for VS, HGTV, Discovery Channel, HBO, and Google.

Check out a short piece from his documentary, Sentinel of the Duneshttp://vimeo.com/2467569

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Julia Haslett
was born in London and is based in New York City. Julia makes expressionistic documentaries about contemporary and historical subjects. She is producer/director of the highly acclaimed Worlds Apart (2003) series about cross-cultural medicine, and producer of the companion hour-long documentary Hold Your Breath (2005), which broadcast on PBS in 2007. Her documentary shorts Hurt & Save (2001), Flooded (2003), Eclipsed (2007), and Pure & Simple (2008) have screened at numerous festivals and galleries, including Full Frame, Athens, and Rooftop Films. She has worked at WGBH-Boston, the Discovery Channel, and as a Filmmaker-in-Residence at the Stanford University Center for Biomedical Ethics. Julia earned a B.A. in English Literature from Swarthmore College and an M.F.A. in Integrated Media Arts from Hunter College (CUNY). She was awarded a MacDowell Colony Fellowship and selected for IFP’s 2009 Documentary Lab for her first feature documentary, An Encounter with Simone Weil, which had its world premiere at IDFA in 2010.

Learn more about Julia’s current film An Encounter with Simone Weil: http://simoneweilmovie.com

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Lily Keber is a filmmaker and educator based in New Orleans. A graduate of the University of Georgia, Lily learned filmmaking at the International Film & Television Workshops in Rockport, ME. She taught at the community arts collective Appalshop in Whitesburg, KY before moving to New Orleans. During the summer of 2007, Lily co-directed Hutto: America’s Family Prison, a short film on the Department of Homeland Security’s policy of family detention. In 2008, Lily co-founded New Orleans Video Voices, a woman-led media collective dedicated to expanding media literacy across the Gulf Coast. Bayou Maharajah is her first documentary feature.

See a trailer for Lily’s film in progress Bayou Maharajahhttp://bayoumaharajah.com

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Jan Krawitz
has been independently producing documentary films for thirty-five years.  Her work has been exhibited at film festivals in the United States and abroad, including Sundance, the New York Film Festival, Nyon, Edinburgh, South by Southwest, AFI/SilverDocs, London, Sydney, and Full Frame. Her most recent film, Big Enough was broadcast on the national PBS series P.O.V. and internationally in eighteen countries. Earlier films, including Mirror Mirrror (P.O.V.), In Harm’s Way (Independent Lens), Little People and Drive-in Blues, received national broadcast on PBS and the Discovery Channel. She served as producer, director, and editor for all of the above-mentioned films. Little People was nominated for a national Emmy Award for “Outstanding Individual Documentary” and was featured on NPR’s All Things Considered.  Krawitz has had one-woman retrospectives of her films at many venues including the Portland Art Museum, Hood Museum of Art, Rice Media Center, the Austin Film Society, and the Ann Arbor Film Festival.  She was awarded an artist’s residency at Yaddo for spring 2011.  Krawitz is a Professor at Stanford University where she directs the M.F.A. Program in Documentary Film and Video.

Recent Press for Jan’s film in progress Perfect Strangershttp://sf360.org/articles/in-production?pageid=13652

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Pearl J Park embarked on producing the documentary film, Can as a means of social change- motivated by mental health tragedies. She previously worked as a designer in the corporate production industry and a print journalist before embarking on film work. She studied documentary production at Downtown Community Television. Born in Korea and raised in Miami, Pearl came to the NY metropolitan area 22 years ago after graduating from Florida International University with a degree in psychology.

Learn more about Pearl’s film in progress, Canhttp://amongourkin.org

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Marilyn Pennell is a faculty member at the University of Hartford where she teaches classes in multimedia and journalism. She has worked in the communication industry for more than 20 years, producing and directing documentary and public affairs programming, earning many awards and honors. Ms. Pennell’s hour long documentary films produced for television includes: Growing Up Nuclear, a film about how the atomic bombing of Hiroshima affected children; Child Care: Everybody’s Baby, a look at how the child care system in Sweden compares with that in the U.S. and First in the Nation, a behind the portrayal of  the New Hampshire Presidential Primary, broadcast nationally on PBS. Thirty minute documentaries include Kurukulla: Portrait of a Tibetan Buddhist Center in Boston and The Golden Years. She is currently working on a documentary project about Tibetan Buddhists in exile in India and the U.S. as a thesis project for a Master of Fine Arts degree in Film at Maine Media College.

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Karen Schoucair
is an independent filmmaker from Lebanon, who has been living in Massachusetts for the past five years. She has done extensive work as a director, cinematographer, and editor. Karen’s latest body of work deals with the socio-political, as well as the rediscovery of her voice as an artist in an environment that expects one to conform to a set of societal standards. Any of the controversial subjects addressed through her films can be subject to conflict, if not within her country of origin, certainly within the household. Karen’s last film Beyrouth 87 is a reenactment of her childhood days during the Lebanese Civil War. She is currently working on the documentary Maid In Lebanon.

Learn more about Karen’s film in progress Maid in Lebanon: http:wix.com/karenschoucair/maidinlebanon

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Martha Swetzoff
has a background in media production that includes experimental works, interface design for non-linear editing, interactive design, projection design for theater, including the original production of The Laramie Project, and her own short and long form films. One of these hour long films, Theme: Murder, about the unsolved murder of her father under the cloud of suspicion of being a “gay” murder, won awards domestically and abroad. Martha has taught at Harvard, UCLA and currently, the Rhode Island School of Design. Her current film in production is a focused look into the culture and community of Steampunk and its devotees.

Learn more about Martha’s film Theme: Murderhttp://www.newday.com/films/ThemeMurder.html

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